The 2013 SURE Symposium

SURE Symposium

Keynote Speaker Bernard McSherry addresses students and faculty during the 2013 SURE Symposium. (Photo by Lee Ferris, Mount Saint Mary College)

by Asma A. Neblett

Students and faculty members from distinct fields gathered to present their Summer Undergrad Research Experience (SURE) projects on September 19th in the Aquinas atrium.

This year’s keynote speaker was Dr. Bernard McSherry—the former governor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)—who presented his address, “Connecting The Dots Looking Backward: The Importance of Personal Interests in Motivating Research.”

Over the summer, in SURE sessions l and ll, students worked closely with faculty members who mentored various research projects across many academic disciplines.

The atrium was turned into a galleria full of research posters, ranging from hubristic consumerism, Filipino American literature, technological expansion in classrooms, to literacy conversations and more.

Vice President of Academic Affairs, Dr. Mary Hinton, and SURE coordinator, Dr. James Moran, could be spotted lending a hand and observing the efforts and interests of the SURE contributors.

After the students presented their projects, Dr. McSherry, who is currently a professor of finance at New Jersey City University, addressed the attendees with his speech in the Aquinas auditorium.

While quoting some of today’s pop artists such as Rihanna and Apple founder, Steve Jobs, McSherry’s stress of having passion and personal interest in the students before him was a heavy undertone in the address.

He contributed that “the world is changing”, and the importance of genuinely liking what you do matters more than ever, especially in moments when and where one’s professional area of interest may become dull.

Following McSherry’s speech was an intimate dinner located in the Villa library for the 2013 SURE members.

Mount student and SURE contributor, Joseph Borden lamented that the experience was “maturing,” and as a student, “you dive into greater depth of academia.”