By Alyssa Walrad

Most of us believed that 2021 would bring a sense of “normalcy” and stability we crave. Yet, Jan. 6 marked the beginning of 2021’s antics, with the deadly insurrection at the nation’s Capitol resulting in dozens of arrests and the death of Capitol police officer Brian D. Sicknick.

Most of us believed that 2021 would bring a sense of “normalcy” and stability we crave. Yet, January 6 marked the beginning of 2021’s antics, with the deadly insurrection at the nation’s Capitol resulting in dozens of arrests and the death of Capitol police officer Brian D. Sicknick. The mob responsible for inciting violence has since been linked to former President Donald Trump who, just hours before, told them to “fight like hell” otherwise they would “not have a country anymore.” This address to the crowd was his downfall, as the transcript of his speech is being analyzed and used as evidence in his second impeachment trial, marking him as the only President in history to be impeached twice. 

According to NBC News, Trump is formally being charged with “incitement of insurrection” and set to preside over Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy. The article of impeachment cites ongoing false election fraud allegations Trump has been claiming since late summer 2020. Trump’s defense team, along with many die-hard Republican congressmen like Ted Cruz and Lindsey Graham, argue that he should not be tried at all since he is no longer in office. Additionally, 45 Republican senators motioned that the proceeding is unconstitutional, and may incite more violence and divide among the American people. Though the typical Trump henchmen will continue to support, the Republican Party as a whole are considerably quiet compared to last year’s impeachment trial, where CNN reports that the Republican National Committee “had a war room” of rebuttals. Today, the RNC has done little to defend the face of their party, and GOP senators are noticeably apprehensive to speak upon the subject and actively avoid it at all costs. 

The House of Representatives continues to move forward with the trial as of late Wednesday. House impeachment manager Stacey Plaskett validates the rumored gatherings and planning of the Jan. 6 insurrection among members of the crowd, going so far to say that Trump’s social media team were aware of the plans and ignored warnings from the FBI that threats were credible. Plaskett states that “they did this all over public forums… We know President Trump monitored these websites” with confirmation from advisers that they were aware of the war-like mentality the group had. Security video footage of various elected officials, including former Vice President Mike Pence, fleaing for safety has further supported the case that Trump fueled the manic rioters. 

The division of Republicans versus Democrats trails on as the second day of the impeachment trial commences. Many GOP’s, including Sen. Ted Cruz, do not think the House managers’ presentations “adequately connect Trump to the attack”, further stating that the presentation’s large emphasis was placed on the “horrific acts of violence” by the rioters, and less on the “language from the President”. On Valentines Day, Trump was acquitted of charges, with a 43-57 vote, just 10 votes shy of the 67 needed to indict him. Trump remains the face of the GOP, and still has a chance to run for office once more in 2024. 

The mob responsible for inciting violence has since been linked to former President Donald Trump who, just hours before, told them to “fight like hell,” otherwise they would “not have a country anymore.” This address to the crowd was his downfall, as the transcript of his speech is being analyzed and used as evidence in his second impeachment trial, marking him as the only president in history to be impeached twice. 

According to NBC News, Trump is formally being charged with “incitement of insurrection” and Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy is set to preside over the trial. The article of impeachment cites ongoing false election fraud allegations Trump has been claiming since late summer of 2020. Trump’s defense team, along with many die-hard Republican congressmen like Ted Cruz and Lindsey Graham, argue that he should not be tried at all since he is no longer in office. Additionally, 45 Republican senators motioned that the proceeding is unconstitutional, and may incite more violence and division among the American people.

Though the typical Trump henchmen will continue to support, the Republican Party as a whole are considerably quiet compared to last year’s impeachment trial, where the Republican National Committee “had a war room” of rebuttals, according to CNN’s reporting. Today, the RNC has done little to defend the face of their party, and GOP senators are noticeably apprehensive to speak upon the subject and actively avoid it at all costs. 

The House of Representatives continues to move forward with the trial as of late Wednesday. House impeachment manager Stacey Plaskett validates the rumored gatherings and planning of the Jan. 6 insurrection among members of the crowd, going so far to say that Trump’s social media team was aware of the plans and ignored warnings from the FBI that threats were credible. Plaskett states that “they did this all over public forums… We know President Trump monitored these websites,” with confirmation from advisers that they were aware of the war-like mentality the group had. Security video footage of various elected officials, including former Vice President Mike Pence, fleeing for safety has further supported the case that Trump fueled the manic rioters. 

The division between Republicans and Democrats trails on as the second day of the impeachment trial commences. Many GOP’s, including Sen. Ted Cruz, do not think the House managers’ presentations “adequately connect Trump to the attack,” further stating that the presentation’s emphasis was largely placed on the “horrific acts of violence” by the rioters, and less on the “language from the President.” The impeachment trial is said to continue through late next week.