Foreign Investment to Combat Against Ebola

Health workers in a Guangzhou hospital take part in an Ebola drill with a mock patient. (Photo courtesy of China Foto Press)

by Angelo Pacheco

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has flooded many news outlets internationally for over a month.

Many nations have been taking precautionary measures to alleviate the entrance of the Ebola virus into their respective nations. Some, like the United States, have had doctors go into West Africa to help treat the virus.

China, however, has taken foreign intervention a step further.

Widely regarded as one of the wealthiest nations on the planet, China has one of the strongest domestic economies and is thriving in foreign investment.

According to Yahoo, the Chinese have made advances in Liberia to open and fund a clinic that combats Ebola.

“About 160 Chinese health workers arrived on Saturday in Liberia, where they are due to staff a new $41 million Ebola clinic that, unlike most other foreign interventions, is being built and fully run by Chinese personnel.”

The clinic is a massive project and the Chinese are aware of the need for high staffing.

“China said this week it would send 1,000 personnel to help fight an outbreak that has killed over 5,000 people in West Africa.”

While the effort is widely appreciated by many West Africans, the Chinese may be using this as a way to further their diplomatic relations with Africa in order to continue being the dominant influence and voice in Africa.

Chinese Ambassador Zhang Yue stated, “Up to now in Liberia, China is the only country which provides not only the construction of an ETU (Ebola treatment unit), but also the running and operation and the staffing of an ETU.”

Furthermore, Yue states, “The establishment of the clinic in Liberia brought China’s contribution to the anti-Ebola effort in the country to $122 million.”

One can believe China is taking part in tremendous charitable endeavors. Readers should also look at China’s investment with a broader lens, for they are also tapping into the scientific market, hoping to find the medical treatments necessary to treat the virus and save lives.